How to get chickens to lay more eggs

Healthy and happy hens lay more eggs. Is there any scientific proof? I don’t know, but in my experience, a healthy hen produces more eggs than an unhealthy, painful chicken. Obviously, we can’t speed up the “egg clock”, but we can make sure that hens are in top condition and that they can produce high-quality eggs without consuming too much of their body stock. We know that hens need a lot of calcium and protein to lay eggs, so giving them extra help can keep them in optimal overall health.

Factors that Affect Egg Production of Poultry

There are many factors that directly or indirectly affect egg yield. To understand these factors, we need to study the history of hens. Factors such as aging, feed consumption, water, light intensity and duration, disease and other factors affect egg production.

Aging Hens: Aging is a major problem in egg production. Hens can live for many years and lay eggs over the years. But after two to three years, the egg-laying rate is much lower. In fact, it depends on the quality of the hens you raise. Good egg chickens lay eggs for about 50 to 60 weeks, then need to rest. This time period is called molting. Poorer and older eggs often shed skins and produce fewer eggs.

Improper Nutrition: Chickens need a balanced diet in which protein and calcium content are sufficient to maintain maximum egg production for a certain period of time. Poor nutrition can cause hens to stop laying eggs. Imbalances in protein, energy and calcium levels reduce egg yields. That’s why providing a consistently balanced food is so important to egg production. Food imbalances can cause many problems, such as fallopian tube sagging. It occurs mainly when the chicken is too fat or the egg is too big. Prolapse can cause permanent damage to the hens.

Management mistakes: Improper management systems can also reduce egg production. Some of the mistakes farmers often make are:

  • Lack of food is one of them. If your hen can’t eat, it will reduce the egg yield. The decrease in egg production depends on the time when there is no food. Make sure your bird has enough food.
  • Water is also an essential element. Water accounts for about 70 per cent of the body weight. Inadequate water supply also reduces egg production. Birds are more sensitive to water than food.
  • Daylight is also an important factor in controlling egg production. Hens need at least 14 hours of light. The light intensity must be sufficient to increase the egg production.

Quality feed: Good feed is the fuel for egg production, and careful nutrition planning is essential for chickens at all stages of development. It is recommended that you eat high-quality egg paste or balls, as well as occasional fresh fruit. Vegetables, worms and other healthy foods.

Stress: Like us, stress can affect our hens. Dog barking and environmental changes are the most common causes of chicken stress. Hens suspend egg production if they feel uncomfortable and unhappy. In order to keep the eggs at peak levels, remove these pressure sources as much as possible. For example, keep noisy children and dogs away from chicken coops.

Keep the coop warm: The temperature of the coop should be kept between 40-90 degrees Fahrenheit (4-32 degrees Celsius). In order to keep their hut warm, add a heated lamp. Heating lamps can be found in most shops, including supermarkets, hardware stores and farm shops.

Take a break: But winter is a good time to rest your girls. Every egg consumes a lot of labor, so the hen naturally wants to take a break. If you want the hen to take a break from all the hard work, don’t add lights. Allowing hens to rest also increases the number of years they continue to lay eggs. You can still get eggs from hens, but not in small quantities. You may even notice that the eggs you get are 1/3 or 1/2 in summer. Scratch is still allowed because it helps promote the metabolism of poultry and keep it warm.